National Parks

Hoyt Arboretum, a 187-acre living museum of trees and plants from all over the world, is located just 2 miles west of downtown Portland. Volunteers staff the Visitor Center and are there to answer questions and help interpret the Arboretum and its tree collections during Visitor Center hours.

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Oaks Park

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Surrounded by the same stately trees for which it was named, Oaks Park, celebrated it’s 100th consecutive year of operation in 2005, making it one of the oldest continuously operating amusement parks in America.

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Imagine stepping into a lush forest, where woodpeckers forage, squirrels leap from limb to limb, owlets wait quietly for their next meal, beavers work busily by the creek, bats bury deep within the creviced bark of a Douglas-fir tree, and wildflowers paint the understory as the seasons change. Discover it all, here at Tryon Creek State Natural Area, your oasis in the city. Where you can explore 658 acres of second-growth forests, walk along the meandering Tryon Creek, and connect with the flora and fauna that call this special place home.

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Sellwood Park

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Sellwood Park is a city park of about 17 acres (6.9 ha) in southeast Portland, in the U.S. state of Oregon. Located at Southeast Seventh Avenue and Miller Street, the park includes courts for tennis and basketball; fields for soccer, baseball, softball, and football; picnic areas; a horseshoe pit; a playground; paved and unpaved paths, and restrooms. The Springwater Corridor trail runs north–south along the west side of the park between it and Sellwood Riverfront Park and Oaks Amusement Park. Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge is just north of Sellwood Park.

Portland has long had a love affair with roses. In 1888, Georgiana Burton Pittock, wife of publisher Henry Pittock, invited her friends and neighbors to exhibit their roses in a tent set up in her garden; thus the Portland Rose Society was established.

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